Hebrew Loan Program (HeLP)
Tampa Jewish Family Services has established a new loan program to address emergency financial needs of families in the Tampa area. HeLP offers interest-free loans for up to 18 months ranging from $500- $2,000.

Loans may be available for a wide variety of financial needs, such as emergency expenses (food or shelter), medical bills, rent or mortgage arrearages, lifecycle events (weddings and funerals), tuition (including preschool or religious school costs), auto repairs, and other such important expenses that need to be paid during these difficult economic times.

The Mission of HeLP
In the tradition of Gimilut Chasidim, the Hebrew Loan Program of Greater Tampa will make available interest-free loans to Jewish affiliated, qualified residents of the greater Tampa area in order to provide a dignified method of assisting those in temporary need of help in a manner that promotes self-reliance.

HeLP Requirements
The repayment period available on any loan provided by HeLP is a maximum of 18 months, based on the loan amount and solely at HeLP’s discretion.

Repayment must be made with post-dated checks.

All applicants must be affiliated with the Jewish community, a resident of the State of Florida for at least one year prior to the application date, and a current resident of Greater Tampa.

Applicants must specify the reason or purpose of the loan on the application.

Applicants must be gainfully employed or have verifiable means to repay loan.

Applicants may need to provide up to two qualified co-signers for each loan.

Persons who currently have a loan with HeLP may not be a cosigner to any loan.

HeLP understands that all information it requests and receives is strictly confidential.

Loans are provided for emergency situations such as rent, mortgage, utilities, and medical needs. Once the loan application is approved, a repayment plan will be established. Repayment usually begins 30 days after receipt of loan.

For more information or to request a loan application, please call 813-960-1848.